AP Economics Syllabus

email: egrochowski@kis.or.kr
phone #: 010-4815-0644

Microeconomics Overview (semester 1):
This portion of the course is an introduction to microeconomics. This subdivision of economics deals with the economy by looking at its smaller parts. Microeconomics focuses on individual economic entities such as consumers and firms and emphasizes the allocation of resources and outputs between individual entities. Microeconomics looks at costs and how firms and consumers make decisions based on these costs.

Macroeconomics Overview (semester 2):
This portion of the course is an introduction to macroeconomics. This subdivision of economics deals with the economy as a whole: aggregate national income and output, government spending and taxation, money and banking, monetary policy and international trade. Microeconomics focuses on individual economic entities such as consumers and firms and emphasizes the allocation of resources and outputs between individual entities. Macroeconomics deals with the overall level of output, its rate of growth, and the level of prices in general.



Course Description:

-Microeconomics
This area of economics deals with individual or "small" players in an economy. In that we will look at economic decision-making stemming from marginal analysis and understanding and interpreting opportunity costs. The topics to be studied include but are not limited to: The invisible hand (market forces) with supply and demand, gains of trade and other effects of the world price, taxes and their effect on supply, demand, and surpluses, tariffs, quotas, elasticity of curves and what it means to economists, government policies and their effects on the economy, more over market failures and government interventions theories and techniques, externalities, factor markets, the nature and functions of product markets, opportunity costs, public goods, the ideas of tax systems, costs of production, the four basic models of competition for firms, consumer choice theory and will learn to generate, interpret, label, and analyze graphs, charts, and data to describe and explain economic concepts. Please see outcomes at the end of the syllabus for further detail.

-Macroeconomics
This subdivision of economics deals with an economy as a whole. What this really means is now we look at what happens when individual players (microeconomics) collide over an entire economic area (city, state, providence, country, or even the entire world). We will be looking at aggregate national income and output, government spending and taxation, money and banking, monetary policy and the monetary system, and international trade, economic production and growth, unemployment (its natural rate and what it indicates), inflation, economic indicators of growth, recession and depression, aggregate demand and supply, using economic tools to measure income and costs of living and what infer about that economy. As we look at these topics individually, we will also develop connections between each topic to the others.

Format of the Class:
This is a college level course. As a result, it is imperative that the student completes all reading and homework when assigned. A considerable amount of instruction will be in the form of lecture. The limited amount of time in class means the students must take it upon themselves to complete the homework assignments. If a student is experiencing difficulty with any concepts they may come to tutorials at regularly scheduled times to be announced in class or by appointment.
We will be working on two major projects over the year: The Online Textbook and the Second Semester Project (still working on a cooler name). These projects will be done mostly out of class, thus students will have to budget their time between studying for class exams and quizzes and working on their projects. Timelines for tests, major quizzes, and projects will be available online on the class wiki page.

Absences:
The student is responsible for notes and assignments missed because of absences (excused or unexcused, extracurricular related or not). Students should acquire the phone numbers of other students to help keep up. Work assigned before the absence is due the day they return.

Grading:
Homework grades and quizzes will be given throughout the semester.
The final six weeks grade will be calculated based on the following:

-60% Exams (there will be three during the semester)

-20% Chapter quizzes (there will be 2-3 major quizzes per semester and one project)

-10% Homework and Mini Quizes

-10% Final Exam

Classroom Expectations:
In this classroom our world revolves around respect. That means respect for the teacher, respect for your classmates, and respect for your self. In that idea we are expected be to class on time, be prepared for class (this includes having assignments that are due completed and ready to turn in prior to class starting) with your book and all necessary supplies, we treat everyone with respect (“put downs” of any sort have a zero tolerance policy in this room and this school and will be dealt with very seriously), when the teacher or anyone else is addressing the class we will listen silently with our total attention on the speaker. Finally we will accept responsibility for our choices and take the consequences (positive and negative as they may be) that result from these choices. All KIS high school rules are enforced as well in this classroom.

If you ever have any questions, comments, or concerns, about the class or in general please come talk to me (Mr. Ski) ASAP. I am here to help you on your journey to your adult life, but I cannot help you if you won't let me. This is a very challenging course and the chances are very good that you will need some sort of help. I am happy to work with you and get your problem resolved (my favorite part of my job) all you need to do is ask.
You can also contact me via email at: eagrochowski@kis.or.kr
or by phone at: 010-4815-0644